San Francisquito Creek Bottlenecks between Highway 101 and Middlefield Road

The Middlefield Road Bridge is the furthest upstream bridge to constrain creek flow with a capacity of about 6,700 cubic feet per second (100-year flood event is 9,300 cfs). NOT CURRENTLY PLANNED FOR CONSTRUCTION
The Pope-Chaucer Streets Bridge is a key breakout point during flows above approximately 5,500 cubic feet per second (the 100-year flood event is 9,300 cfs).
The University Avenue Bridge has a flow capacity of about 6,800 cubic feet per second (100-year flood event is 9,300 cfs) and is surrounded by development and roadways up to the bank's edge. NOT CURRENTLY PLANNED FOR CONSTRUCTION
In addition to other deficiencies, the 102 year old Newell Road Bridge has a hydraulic capacity of about 6,300 cubic feet per second (the 100-year flood event is 9,300 cfs) and the December 23, 2012 flood came within three feet of overtopping at this location. The City of Palo Alto is leading an analysis of the impacts of building a new Newell Road Bridge.
San Francisquito Creek under Highway 101 and its frontage roads (East & West Bayshore), and immediately upstream and downstream of these roadways, is the most constricted part of the creek. On December 23, 2012 flooding occurred on these roadways and just downstream in East Palo Alto. The Highway and frontage roads are being rebuilt by Caltrans.
The bottleneck upsteam of the University Avenue Bridge resulted in flooding during the December 23, 2012 storm and is subject to ongoing emergency repair work.
The bottleneck downstream of the University Avenue Bridge was substantially scoured during the December 2012 flood and is subject to ongoing emergency repair work."
Upstream of the Newell Road Bridge the creek channel is constrained by the sacked concrete used to reinforce both channel banks in the 1950's.
Downstream of the Newell Road Bridge, San Francisquito creek is constricted and the banks are reinforced with sacked concrete.